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postheadericon Beginner triathlete – novice ironman and the importance of wetsuits – warmer, lighter or faster

Beginner Triathlete – Novice Ironman and the Importance of Wetsuits – Warmer, Lighter Or Faster?

It is pretty obvious to the triathlon community that triathlon wetsuits are not all created equal.

At the same time, it often feels like we have taken the importance of exactly how a triathlon wetsuit is actually constructed a bit too seriously. After all, when it comes right down to it, is really necessary to get excited about a wetsuit because it is a millimeter thicker than the one you owned the previous season?

It appears that the goal is to have a creation that is thinner and faster, but still as warm as a wetsuit with thicker construction.

IN THE EARLY DAYS

In the early days of triathlon the races were few and far between. To make matters worse, in many areas with water temperatures that hovered around 60 degrees Fahrenheit it was a challenge for many triathletes just to avoid hypothermia. There simply were no wetsuits back then except perhaps for the early “Farmer John” type that did nothing at all to keep a person warmer, which begs the question, “what exactly did they do”?

Of course a person could always buy a “dry-suit” –that would be impossibly heavy and hot– at a dive shop, but it would be years before the real triathlon “wetsuits” were available to all triathletes regardless of where they lived.

For the Canadian triathlete, it was pretty much almost a certainty that hypothermia was going to rear its head in any triathlon swim leg in Canada back in the eighties unless the race happened to be on the West Coast. The severity of the hypothermia often depended on actual swimming ability of the triathlete. The better a triathlete could swim back then, the sooner the swim leg would be over so it was a simple matter of those whoever got out of the water the soonest were less likely to suffer from the cold as much.

EFFICIENT SWIMMING IS THE KEY

If a triathlete did not have an energy-saving stroke it was often difficult to retain enough co-ordination once out of the water to be able to climb on a bike. It was not unusual for it to take ten minutes or more for a triathlete to warm up enough to be able to cycle at all. Some of the early triathletes reached the danger point of hypothermia and were often unable to carry on in the race at all.

The wetsuit was born in the mid to late eighties and began to evolve at a quick pace in the decades to follow. Every single year you could pretty much be guaranteed that a new improved wetsuit would be on the market. Often the new wetsuits came with the promise that it would make you a faster swimmer then ever before.

FASTER IS NOT ALWAYS BETTER

This philosophy of “faster is better” really sucked people in because they had yet to figure out how little importance swim time really has on the end result of an Ironman. This is especially true of age-groupers who simply want to finish the race any way they can. Still, many triathletes were sucked in over and over again and could spend a few thousand dollars on wetsuits over a career.

Unfortunately, it would take years for some triathletes to figure out that swimming faster is not the secret to a successful Ironman. Real success is realized when emphasis is placed on finishing the swim leg of an Ironman with as little energy loss as possible. In reality, success in an Ironman has very little to do with the thickness of a wetsuit, how seamless the stitching, or how stretchy the armpits are.

STAYING WARM IS THE KEY

Ultimately, the most important feature of a wetsuit for the average age-group triathlete or novice Ironman is the protection it provides from the cold. It is of paramount importance to always keep in mind that if you burn yourself out from the swim because you lack a smooth, energy-saving stroke you will most likely be part of the Ironman “death march”.

For the beginner triathlete or novice Ironman, the goal should be to get through the swim with as little discomfort as possible and with as little mental, emotional, and physical stress as possible. Any type of stress has a way of contributing to the loss energy that will without a doubt be desperately need later on in the race. This is most especially true to the Ironman because of the sheer distance of the race.

postheadericon Advantages of horse back riding

Advantages of Horse Back Riding

For many centuries horseback riding has been much popular for many reasons. Soon, horse riding became a chief mode of travel. First, horses were mainly used for fighting and hunting purposes as the speed of the horse gave people good advantage. With the arrival of carriages, people are able to move themselves and their belongings to long distances with very little difficulty. But nowadays, horseback riding finds its use in recreation and therapy. Horseback riding camps are offered from almost anywhere in the world to anyone. It provides a wonderful and thrilling experience much more than merely riding through hills and valleys.

Instructions about caring of horses and grooming are also fundamental requirements for attending these camps. They will teach about various kinds of tack, like saddles, halters, bridles, bits and other horse gear. Most of the riding levels catered to in these camps, and they are appropriate for both beginner and experienced riders who might find themselves lucky enough to possess a horse for the first time in their life time.

While choosing a horseback riding camp, you should first make a decision on which style of riding your children wants to learn. Western riding is usually associated with ranches, cowboys and rodeos. These camps could be found all through the United States, and are also commonly known as Dude Ranches or Guest Ranches in western portions of the country. Most of the western riding activities comprises of trail riding and barrel racing. Western saddles are designed keeping comfort and security of the riders in mind, so it will have a higher seat back and front so riders feel the safety while on the horse.

On the other hand English riding, in general focuses on racing and horsemanship. This riding style requires both the horse and rider to have more freedom of movement, so these saddles will not give as much as support and security as in a Western style saddle. For a first time rider, you can consider joining a western riding camp.

Horseback riding is a very good therapy for people of any age with any physical disabilities. This therapy provides a funny environment to carry out new skills and also e skills existing that people are seeking to improve. Also they enjoy the benefits of being around people with whom they could relate easily. By following the instructions of the riding counselors, we can discover how to walk, run and canter the horses correctly with confidence. After attaining enough skill and self-confidence, take part in supervised trail rides and advanced riders could learn various show fundamentals.

If you are eagerly looking to do something different the next time summer rolls about, you could consider horseback riding camps. The experiences and enjoyment gained at these camps will make sure that your stay would be a highlight and you’ll keep in mind forever. Starting with the least experienced or novice level, these camps could teach your kids a lot about receiving comfortable experience with the horses themselves additionally to riding them. When they get the basics down, and if they choose like that, they could ultimately advance their skills to much higher levels.

postheadericon Nothing new under the sun: mixed martial arts bears striking resemblance to ancient greek pankration

Nothing New Under the Sun: Mixed Martial Arts Bears Striking Resemblance to Ancient Greek Pankration

A lot can change in 2,650 years. Apparently, though, when it comes to sports, everything old is new again. At least when it comes to the sport that boasts the fastest-growing popularity in the U.S. today: Mixed Martial Arts.

But whether you call it Mixed Martial Arts or Ultimate Fighting, this sport is far from modern. Combining Greco-Roman wrestling with a variety of martial arts techniques, the sport closely resembles the free-form ancient Greek competitive sport of pankration.

Dating back to 648 B.C., when it was introduced into the Olympics, the sport of pankration was bound by two rules: no eye gouging and no biting. Sounds like the rules my Kindergarten teacher established. Beyond that, though, anything was fair game in this competition, whose name comes from two Greek words: pan, meaning “all”; and kratos, meaning “powers.”

With individual matches often lasting hours (and sometimes resulting in the death of one or both combatants), the game quickly became the most popular Olympic sport.

Its popularity declined at the time of the rise of the Roman Empire, when other combat sports began taking precedence. In the modern Western World, boxing and wrestling grew in popularity while in the East, traditional martial arts flourished.

Flash forward to the 1900s. Twenty-one-year-old Brazilian Carlos Gracie, who was trained in judo by renowned Japanese champion Mitsuyo Maeda, began teaching his four brothers the art as it was taught to him. In 1925, Carlos and younger brother Helio moved to Rio de Janeiro, where they opened a jiu-jitsu studio and instituted the “Gracie Challenge,” taking on all who wished to compete against them. Begun as a means of drawing attention to their newly opened academy, the Gracie Challenge drew fighters in disciplines ranging from karate and other martial arts to boxing, capoeira (an Afro-Brazilian fighting form) and even wrestling.

Prospective fighters – and hordes of spectators – began to flock to these matches; before long, they were drawing such enormous crowds, the matches had to be held in the largest Brazilian soccer arenas. Eventually, the sport (known as vale-tudo, the Portuguese term for “anything goes”) had grown to become the second most popular sport in Brazil, right behind soccer (a status that is still maintained today).

From 1935 to 1951, 135-pound Helio Gracie fought and defeated in excess of 1,000 competitors in this unarmed combat form; many of his opponents outweighed him by more than 100 pounds.

In 1993, MMA took on a new dimension with the institution of the Ultimate Fighting Championship, based on Brazilian vale-tudo (which California salesman Art Davie learned from Helio’s son Rorito in the Gracie Jiu-Jitsu school two years earlier).

Derided as “human cockfighting,” the no-holds-barred fighting style was often said to be more brutality than sporting competition. Today, MMA and UFC are growing in popularity, with UFC expanding beyond its early pay-per-view audiences and gaining greater exposure on regular U.S. and Canadian cable television.

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